Monday, September 24, 2007

Five poems by Bob Heman


Five poems
by Bob Heman












INFORMATION

Enters the room that is the same room over and over again. Each time it is different. There is a woman or an insect or a chair that is broken. The light comes in from a place where there should have been a window.

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Light enters the bear every day at 5 o’clock. It is the same bear they move outside when the weather is nice. The girls play silly games with it, but they are never considered silly girls.

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There is a restaurant in Switzerland where the waitresses are blind and the diners eat in total darkness. This much is fact. That there were stars above their heads had to be accepted on faith. The meals themselves were still alive but too afraid to ever crawl away.

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The loaf of bread resembles the animal that was baked inside. The woman wears a garment that offers no auditory clues. She steps onto the road that was only drawn on. Her body the words they found in a book.

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INFORMATION

The compass is the mask the evil one chooses when he enters the ship. The waves are expected to repeat themselves. He uses the horizon to contain them. Sometimes something else leaks in from outside.


Author bio:

Bob Heman's prose poems have appeared in numerous publications including Sentence, Paragraph, Quick Fiction, First Intensity, The Prose Poem: An International Journal, Caliban, Artful Dodge, Key Satch(el), Mad Hatter’s Review, and Action Yes, and have been translated into Arabic, Spanish and Hungarian. An e-book, How It All Began, which collects 33 prose poems written between 1975 and 1990, is available as a free download from Quale Press at www.quale.com. Bob has edited CLWN WR (formerly Clown War) since 1971.

2 comments:

Peter Schwartz said...

Great form Bob. The content itself is loose and original. It's refreshing to see some poetry that knows how to play without sacrificing meaning.

Anonymous said...

You forgot Andrew Jackson’s Big Block of Cheese with nary a macaroni in sight.